Talking to kids about Alzheimer’s disease

e-Update from the Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center, a service of the National Institute on Aging at N I H
 
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When a family member has Alzheimer’s disease, it affects everyone in the family, including children and grandchildren. It’s important to talk to them about what is happening. How much and what kind of information you share depends on the child’s age and relationship to the person with Alzheimer’s.

Here are some tips to help kids understand what is happening:

    • Answer their questions simply and honestly. For example, you might tell a young child, “Grandma has an illness that makes it hard for her to remember things.”
    • Help them understand that their feelings of sadness and anger are normal.
    • Comfort them. Tell them no one caused the disease.

Share this information on social media:

Twitter: Kids will have questions about #Alzheimers—answer them simply and honestly. Get tips on how to talk to kids about Alz: http://bit.ly/2hSdQmi

Facebook: When a family member has Alzheimer’s disease, it affects everyone in the family, including children and grandchildren. It’s important to talk to them about what is happening. Get tips on how to talk to kids about Alzheimer’s in this tip sheet from NIH: http://bit.ly/2i7Dh2G

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National Institute on Aging


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